©  Copyright Rachell Elaine Jackson.  All Rights Reserved.  Website design and hosting by North Mobile Internet Services, Inc.

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The Easter Parade Route July 19, 2016 A few years ago, I rode a float in the New Orleans Easter Parade through the French Quarter and tossed white beads to hundreds of waving hands. The parade began at Canal Street and marched up Bourbon Street to St. Philip where we were to turn south. But we couldn’t because it was blocked by some big trucks and the owners couldn’t be found. So we continued on Bourbon until we reached Esplanade four blocks further. It was a four lane street divided by a grassy division with huge trees. Before we could turn south at the corner, we were stopped again. The tree branches were too low for the tall floats, so someone was called to come trim the trees. Only then we were able to continue southward to Decatur, turn right and return to Canal Street. The original distance was a little over two miles, while the new distance covered almost three miles. That was not a problem for those of us on the floats—except for the hot sun and no breezes—but the band members, especially those carrying large and heavy instruments such as drums and sousaphones, were totally exhausted and perspiring as if they had been in a downpour. That situation was perfect for the climax for my book, When’s Daddy Comin’ Home? In it, Duffy, a small seventh grade girl, carried and played the sousaphone! Could she have endured a three mile parade in that heat? And would her daddy be waiting for her when the parade was over? There’s one way to find out. Read the book! –Rachell Elaine Jackson
©  Copyright Rachell Elaine Jackson.  All Rights Reserved.  Website design and hosting by North Mobile Internet Services, Inc.

Blog

The Easter Parade Route July 19, 2016 A few years ago, I rode a float in the New Orleans Easter Parade through the French Quarter and tossed white beads to hundreds of waving hands. The parade began at Canal Street and marched up Bourbon Street to St. Philip where we were to turn south. But we couldn’t because it was blocked by some big trucks and the owners couldn’t be found. So we continued on Bourbon until we reached Esplanade four blocks further. It was a four lane street divided by a grassy division with huge trees. Before we could turn south at the corner, we were stopped again. The tree branches were too low for the tall floats, so someone was called to come trim the trees. Only then we were able to continue southward to Decatur, turn right and return to Canal Street. The original distance was a little over two miles, while the new distance covered almost three miles. That was not a problem for those of us on the floats—except for the hot sun and no breezes—but the band members, especially those carrying large and heavy instruments such as drums and sousaphones, were totally exhausted and perspiring as if they had been in a downpour. That situation was perfect for the climax for my book, When’s Daddy Comin’ Home? In it, Duffy, a small seventh grade girl, carried and played the sousaphone! Could she have endured a three mile parade in that heat? And would her daddy be waiting for her when the parade was over? There’s one way to find out. Read the book! –Rachell Elaine Jackson

Author of middle grade books for tweens and teens

RachellElaineJackson
RachellElaineJackson

Author of middle grade books for tweens and teens